11th Annual Reggae Culture Salute

#CultureSalute
#RASTAFARI
#theMEDITATIONS #RasOsagyefo

Excerpt:
[…] The family friendly, multimedia presentation commemorates the anniversary of the coronation of His Imperial Majesty Emperor Haile Selassie I and Empress Mennen of Ethiopia and is the hallmark event of the Coalition to Preserve Reggae Music.

The evening will highlight the organic relationship between Reggae, Rasta, Emperor Selassie and Jamaica in a substantive way through a multimedia presentation that will engage the audience and raise awareness of the importance of this cultural phenomenon to a people’s identity.[•••]

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The 11th annual Reggae Culture Salute takes place on November 7 at Nazareth Regional High School Performance Center, located at 475 East 57th Street, Brooklyn, New York from 8:00pm to 1:00am. There will be a full line-up of performers and refreshments, including Caribbean food and beverage, and exhibitors as well as vendors of African arts and crafts.

The family friendly, multimedia presentation commemorates the anniversary of the coronation of His Imperial Majesty Emperor Haile Selassie I and Empress Mennen of Ethiopia and is the hallmark event of the Coalition to Preserve Reggae Music. The evening will highlight the organic relationship between Reggae, Rasta, Emperor Selassie and Jamaica in a substantive way through a multimedia presentation that will engage the audience and raise awareness of the importance of this cultural phenomenon to a people’s identity.

This year, Reggae Culture Salute (RCS) will present The Meditations, a group which emerged in the…

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Obama’s Education Reversal is Sheer Political “Theater”

Excerpt:
[…] Executive editor and founder of Black Agenda Report Glen Ford says that the Obama administration claim to want a reduction in time spent on standardized tests is election time insincerity.[…]

Executive editor and founder of Black Agenda ReportGlen Ford says that the Obama administration claim to want a reduction in time spent on standardized tests is election time insincerity.

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Hey NYC! The Reel Sisters of the Diaspora Film Festival and Lecture Series is this Weekend

Excerpt:
[…] Reel Sisters of the Diaspora Film Festival & Lecture Series will present more than 30 diverse films that are guaranteed to inspire, uplift and spark dinner time conversations among family and friends. The festival will be held October 24-25, 2015 at LIU’s Brooklyn campus, at Flatbush and Dekalb Aves. Screenings will take place in the Salena Gallery’s screening rooms and Kumble Theater.

For schedule and tickets, visit reelsisters.org /kumbletheater.org or call 718-488-1624 / 347-534-3304.

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A report by Tambay A. Obenson for Indie Wire.

Hey NYC! This one’s for you specifically… something to add to your weekend to-do list.

See details on the feature-rich Reel Sisters of the Diaspora Film Festival & Lecture Series kicking off tomorrow, Saturday, October 24, through Sunday October 25.

For a full schedule of events as well as ticket information, visit reelsisters.org or kumbletheater.org.

Reel Sisters of the Diaspora Film Festival & Lecture Series will present more than 30 diverse films that are guaranteed to inspire, uplift and spark dinner time conversations among family and friends. The festival will be held October 24-25, 2015 at LIU’s Brooklyn campus, at Flatbush and Dekalb Aves.  Screenings will take place in the Salena Gallery’s screening rooms and Kumble Theater. For schedule and tickets, visit reelsisters.org /kumbletheater.org or call 718-488-1624 / 347-534-3304.

To cite just a few notable films screening this year, narratives…

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Haiti Cultural Exchange presents Allenby Augustin and a “Bann Konte” Event

Excerpt:
[…] Allenby Augustin, director of Haiti-based Akoustik Prod., an organization that works to promote the traditional arts of Haiti will join Haiti Cultural Exchange for a one-week arts residency. Programming will incorporate conversations, workshops and performances and will culminate on Sunday, November 1, at 2:00pm, with Bann Konte—a procession of rara musicians, traditional games, and folktales—which will “take over the streets of Crown Heights.” […]

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Bann Konte Flyer

Allenby Augustin, director of Haiti-based Akoustik Prod., an organization that works to promote the traditional arts of Haiti will join Haiti Cultural Exchange for a one-week arts residency. Programming will incorporate conversations, workshops and performances and will culminate on Sunday, November 1, at 2:00pm, with Bann Konte—a procession of rara musicians, traditional games, and folktales—which will “take over the streets of Crown Heights.” This event will take place at Haiti Cultural Exchange (558 St. John’s Place in Brooklyn, New York).

Description: Featuring the historic Haitian conch, traditional konè (a long metal horn), bamboo trumpets and Haitian drums, Bann Konte will travel and engage audiences throughout Crown Heights while presenting traditional Haitian folktales, games and songs. The rhythmic procession, staccato of instruments and songs, will allow the public to fully appreciate the delivery of stories in an atmosphere of conviviality and creativity.

banPerformers will include: Allenby Augustin, Goussy Célestin, Schneider Laurent, Michèle Voltaire Marcelin and…

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Jamaica moving to reclaim global dominance in reggae, island’s best-known cultural export

Excerpt:
…Jamaican artists say sustained support from the government could give the local music industry a much-needed boost and help prepare musicians to get a greater slice of the international market. There’s high hope for emerging artists like Chronnix, the most prominent member of a burgeoning scene dubbed “reggae revival” whose young artists are building their careers with a savvy understanding of social media.

Jamaica celebrates “reggae month” each February. This year, events included workshops on intellectual property for up-and-coming musicians. The island’s biggest university also recently hosted an international reggae conference, where the global business of reggae was a featured topic.

While non-Jamaican reggae artists are having the most success with the niche genre, Smith and others believe it’s only a matter of time before Jamaicans dominate reggae again. […]

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For decades, the sound of Jamaica has been reggae, the infectious, uniquely syncopated music that transformed the small Caribbean island into a cultural powerhouse.But the genre’s success has taken it far beyond its roots, and now many in Jamaica worry that reggae-lovers abroad are forgetting the motherland where it was born, the Associated Press reports.

“Reggae was given to the world by Jamaica so nobody can or ever should discourage anyone overseas from making this music. But we think there should be acknowledgment that reggae was created in Jamaica,” said Michael “Ibo” Cooper, a musician who is chairman of the Jamaica Reggae Industry Association.

Around the world, music festivals celebrating the sounds made famous by reggae patron saint Bob Marley and followers who developed the faster, brasher derivative of dancehall are more likely to be headlined by bands from places like California or France than by native-born Jamaicans. Aside from…

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Argentina to Support Jamaica’s Move for Inscription of Reggae to UNESCO’s Culture List

Excerpt:
…Only four months after securing Jamaica’s first ever historic listing to UNESCO’s prestigious World Heritage List, with the Blue and John Crow Mountains, the government is set to begin the process of safeguarding the island’s Reggae music, Caribbean 360 reports…

Intangible cultural heritage is defined to include oral traditions, performing arts, social practices, rituals, festive events, knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe or the knowledge and skills to produce traditional crafts. As noted by UNESCO the importance of intangible cultural heritage is not the cultural manifestation itself but rather the wealth of knowledge and skills that is transmitted through it from one generation to the next.

The social and economic value of this transmission of knowledge is relevant for minority groups and for mainstream social groups within a State, and is as important for developing States as for developed ones.[…]

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Only four months after securing Jamaica’s first ever historic listing to UNESCO’s prestigious World Heritage List, with the Blue and John Crow Mountains, the government is set to begin the process of safeguarding the island’s Reggae music, Caribbean 360 reports.

And it’s getting support from Argentina which successfully inscribed Tango to the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH) of Humanity in 2009 as a joint nomination with its neighbour Uruguay.

According to the Minister of Youth and Culture Lisa Hanna, the Argentinean mission to Jamaica, led by Ambassador Ariel Fernandez, has pledged technical support for Jamaica to guide the detailed process towards formally safeguarding Reggae as an element that demonstrates the diversity and overwhelming impact of Jamaica’s heritage, as well as raise awareness about its importance as an ICH on the global stage.

“Jamaica, through the existing Bi-Lateral Cultural Agreements with Argentina, will be leveraging the expertise of…

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Jamaican Marlon James’s Bob Marley novel wins Man Booker prize

SALUTE. & CONGRATS! Marlon James!!!!

Excerpt:

…James, who said he had been inspired to become a writer by his father, said he had decided to give up writing after one of his books was rejected 70 times, but eventually it was published and he was able to put the voices he heard in Jamaica into his work.

“The reggae singers … were the first to recognise that the voice coming out of our mouths was a legitimate voice of fiction …that the son of the market woman can speak poetry,” he said

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Marlon James became the first Jamaican to win the Man Booker fiction prize on Tuesday for “A Brief History of Seven Killings”, inspired by an attempt to kill reggae star Bob Marley, and said he hoped more Caribbean writers will follow, Reuters reports.

The 686-page novel, which uses Jamaican patois, Harlem slang and liberal doses of scatological language, tells the story of a gang of cocaine-fuelled ghetto kids armed with automatic weapons who tried but failed to kill Marley in the Jamaican capital Kingston in 1976 before he gave a peace concert.

“Jamaica has a really really rich literary tradition, it is kind of surreal being the first and I hope I’m not the last and I don’t think I will be,” James, 44, said after winning the award.

“There is a real universe of sort of spunky creativity that’s happening,” he added. “I hope it brings more attention to…

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Land-rush revolution: US-Cuba talks rile island’s real-estate market

Excerpt:
… A combination of strict laws on both sides, however, is keeping that from being a reality.

For starters, the U.S. embargo makes it illegal for Americans to invest on the island. And while Cubans and foreign permanent residents can buy and sell freely, those who live abroad are relegated to a few tightly controlled housing enclaves that aren’t particularly a bargain.

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This article analyzes the potential frenzy in Cuba’s real estate sector, as momentum picks up in wake of rapprochement talks with United States. Here are excerpts; see full article in the link below:

When the communist island began allowing citizens to buy and sell their homes almost four years ago, it was a godsend for Nieves Puig Macías. The 56-year-old retired architect is suffering from an array of health problems — from bad kidneys to a bum arm — that make it hard for her to get around her three-story home. She’s been hoping to sell it and move into a ground-level dwelling. But two years later, she says she has a new problem: greedy real-estate agents who are so keen on turning a profit that her house has languished, overpriced, on the market.

In just a few short years, Cuba’s nonexistent real-estate sector has boomed into a multifaceted, sometimes…

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AUTHOR EDWIDGE DANTICAT ON THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC: “GOVERNMENT IS TRYING TO ERASE A WHOLE SEGMENT OF HISTORY”

Excerpt:
…This past summer, Danticat visited two of the informal settlement camps that have sprung up along the southern border of Haiti: one in Malpasse, and the other in Anse-à-Pitres.

“It’s a really horrible situation in which people are in the most terrible sort of limbo you can imagine,” Danticat says. “The Dominican Republic says that many of the people in the camps have voluntarily returned, but if you talk to them they say that the law has empowered their neighbors to threaten them.

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This article by Dana de Greff appeared in The Miami New Times.

Physical and symbolic lines have long divided the island of Hispaniola. On the one side is Haiti, on the other, the Dominican Republic — two vastly different countries that have had a turbulent history. The Dominican Republic, which has a population of about 10 million, has both benefited from and criticized the illegal migration of Haitians. In 2013, the Dominican Constitutional Court ruled that children born to migrant non-citizen parents were no longer automatically considered citizens. The ruling also stated that citizenship would only be granted to people who were born to at least one Dominican parent since 1929. In one fell swoop, an estimated 300,000 people were rendered stateless.

“I think going back that far, it’s almost as if [the Dominican government] is trying to erase this whole segment of history and population of people,” says…

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