David Hinds, Sister Carol to be feted at Rasta Banquet

Hail RASTAFARI!!!

Excerpt:
[…]..David Hinds lead singer of British reggae band Steel Pulse and avowed Mother Culture, Sister Carol are slated to receive Rastafari Meritorious Awards for their dedication to advancing the music, culture and heritage of Black people throughout the world.

Another highlight of the celebration is the fact Prince Ermias Sahle Selassie, grandson of the emperor has confirmed his attendance at the banquet.

According to the DARC mission statement, their aim is “to promote and preserve the advancement of Rastafari through social, cultural, economic, scientific and technological ventures. The purpose is to provide sustainable outlets for the African community globally that will advocate the right to return to our African homeland; to protect the self-determination of the movement; and to engender selfless public service while safeguarding African culture and tradition.” […]

Repeating Islands

dav10-30-vkp-rasta-banquet-cl01_zAccording to Vinette K. Price (Caribbean Life), two of reggae music’s most devout proponents will be lauded by Diaspora African Rastafari Congress (DARC) on Sunday November 8 when the inaugural Ethiophile banquet will commemorate the crowning of Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie I. The anniversary event will also celebrate the birth of the Rastafari nation. It will be held at Golden Terrace, 120-23 Atlantic Avenue in Richmond Hill, Queens, New York, from 6:00pm to 11:00pm.

See excerpts here and access the full article in the link below:

David Hinds lead singer of British reggae band Steel Pulse and avowed Mother Culture, Sister Carol are slated to receive Rastafari Meritorious Awards for their dedication to advancing the music, culture and heritage of Black people throughout the world.

[. . .] The multi-purpose banquet will pay homage to African Zion Divine Negus Nagast on the 85th anniversary of his coronation.

pressSister_Carol_1Perhaps…

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Fabian Marley promotes new single in France

AFRIKAN LIBERATION!!!!

Repeating Islands

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Reggae singer Fabian Marley heads to France to officially kick off the European leg of an exciting promotional campaign for his new single, ‘Nah Say We Poor’, on the Massive Entertainment Group label, Jamaica’s Star reports.

This will be Marley’s first time in France – Paris, to be exact – and the singer is overflowing with enthusiasm and positive vibe.

Fabian, who wears many hats, including those of singer, song-writer, composer, arranger, producer and accomplished musician, is ready to put his career forward and let the public judge his talent.

He will be accompanied to France by his manager, Clayton Thomas, CEO of Massive Entertainment Group, which is based in the US. Quite understandably, Thomas is Marley’s staunchest supporter, and although he admits that he heard of the singer through music industry links, it was the artiste’s own raw talent that was the ultimate factor in making the management decision.

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Black Women Matter…Video

#sayHERname

Black Women Stand Up

We must continue to #SayHerName #SandraBland along with the many other Black Women and Women of Color who have lost their lives at the hands of police! This is a touching video which highlights these women, and reminds us of the importance of keeping their names and stories alive.

Thank you to #ForHarriet for this video that we all should continue to circulate and bring attention to, Black Women, we need you to keep Standing Up. We are all in the struggle together.
#BlackWomenStandUp #BWSU
,

Peace and Always Love.
BWSU

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Belafonte, Usher Talk Pop Culture and Activism

Excerpt:
[•••] Last Friday evening, scores of young people turned up at the Kaufmann Concert Hall in New York City to listen to both men speak on issues surrounding the need to be involved in activism. The discussion, under the theme ‘Breaking the Chains of Social Injustice’, was moderated by former CNN anchorwoman Soledad O’Brien.

Repeating Islands

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Civil rights activist Harry Belafonte made headlines last weekend following discussions he had with American R&B artiste Usher about popular culture and activism.

Last Friday evening, scores of young people turned up at the Kaufmann Concert Hall in New York City to listen to both men speak on issues surrounding the need to be involved in activism. The discussion, under the theme ‘Breaking the Chains of Social Injustice’, was moderated by former CNN anchorwoman Soledad O’Brien.

Belafonte, 88, suffered a seizure the evening before but was well enough to engage the audience in a riveting discussion, according to online sources. The entertainer charged his fellow musicians to remember that they have a social responsibility, a message he has been preaching for several years and which led to a falling out between himself and hip-hop mogul Jay Z.

Belafonte and Jay Z have been at loggerheads since 2012 when Belafonte said…

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Remembering the Morant Bay Rebellion

The Struggle for Liberation, JUSTICE & Equity continues to this day. In the song, Revolution, Dennis Brown asked us, “…are you ready to STAND Up and Fight the ‘right’ REVOLUTION…many are called, few are chosen..[•••].”

Excerpt:
[•••] In 1865, Jamaican people confronted the state in their search for those rights and freedoms they assumed would have accompanied Emancipation from enslavement in 1838, but which remained elusive decades after. Rather than constructing a post-slavery society built on mutual respect, equality and non-racialism, the British colonialists cemented their socio-economic and political control over the Jamaican masses and presided over a system of racial apartheid. This led to increasing protests as those emerging out of slavery, or their descendants, refused to live in a society that simply continued the slave relations of production.

Repeating Islands

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Joshua Surtees (The Voice) discusses Jamaica’s 150th anniversary and presents reflections on the Morant Bay Rebellion by Verene Shepherd, professor of social history at the University of the West Indies. Here are excerpts of the historical account and an interview with Dr. Shepherd:

Slavery may have been over, but the situation for many of Jamaica’s freed men and women remained dire in the decades following abolition. Prevented from voting by the unaffordable poll tax and denied the right to own land for cultivation, most people lived in poverty and suffered poor health. A petition from the people of St Ann to Queen Victoria asking for land to be granted was intercepted by the governor, John Eyre, who persuaded the monarch to deny their request. The Royal’s response to her foreign subjects was, effectively, to “work harder”.

Angered at the disenfranchisement of the poor, Paul Bogle (1822-1865), a wealthy…

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