Hip-Hop Video Director Spiff TV Will Make Music History in 2016

SALUTE to Spiff TV!!!

Constant Conscious Evolution of CULTUREZ

Forward is the Movement

[•••] Years of A&R-ing for millennial rappers, shooting vivid visuals and unearthing some of your favorite hip-hop beats (see Albert Anastasia) resulted in Spiff carving out a lane for himself.

In an era where rap music isn’t just rap music but often a fusion of genres, and urban latino means a gamut of caribbean and Afro sounds, Spiff is capitalizing on momentum while simultaneously putting on for his culture. How? By single-handedly producing a full-length album boasting some of the most innovative collaborations yet, between reggaeton and rap artists.[—]

Repeating Islands

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An interview with Marjua Estevez for Vibe. Here are some excerpt. Follow this link for the complete interview.

Spiff TV, né Carlos Suarez, moves around the proverbial chessboard with meticulous sway, always predicting the upward trend in music—eyes on the Internet and ears to the streets. A child of hip-hop and overall student of the industry, Spiff has spent the last decade building his résumé, most notably as Rick Ross’ chief video director. Yet, the music producer and A&R at large can trace his wizardry behind the lens back to when reggaeton, a historically underground music, began to sweep Orlando (or Little Puerto Rico) circa early 2000s.

“I was working with Noreaga,” he says to VIBE Viva. “When he was doing ‘Oye Mi Canto’ and all those other big Latin records, I was going on the road with him.”

Years of A&R-ing for millennial rappers, shooting vivid visuals and unearthing some of your favorite hip-hop beats (see Albert…

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Haiti Deserves a Legitimate Election

JUSTICE for AYITI & her PEOPLE!!!

End The U.N.-U.S. Occupation

Justice, NOT Charity!!!!

Repeating Islands

13sun2web-articleLarge.jpgAn editorial from The New York Times.

There is an electoral crisis in Haiti. An election in October to choose a successor to President Michel Martelly was so marred by reports of ballot tampering, illegal voting and other abuses that the result has been widely denounced as illegitimate.

Not just by the dozens of losing candidates — there were 54 people on the presidential ballot — but by independent election observers, human-rights groups, Haitian religious leaders, organizations of the Haitian diaspora and ordinary citizens who have taken to the streets in angry, sometimes violent, demonstrations.

The country is supposed to hold a runoff election on Dec. 27 between the first-place finisher, Jovenel Moïse, and the first runner-up, Jude Célestin. But Mr. Célestin has called the October results a “ridiculous farce” and threatened to withdraw from the runoff. He has formed a coalition of eight presidential candidates who are demanding

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Gentrification threatening to destroy Little Haiti, community leaders warn

Affordable Housing for ALL!!!
End Displacement & Gentrification!!!

[…] ..“In the midst of this beautiful international art bonanza, in Little Haiti a different story has emerged,” said Marleine Bastien, executive director of Fanm Ayisyen nan Miyami, which organized the demonstration. “This is the story of business and homeowners being pressured and threatened one minute, sweet-talked the next to sell their homes. They’re being offered two, three times the property of their homes to get out. Gentrification is here, baby.” […]

[…] Gentrification is already affecting residents, Bastien said, and a number of them showed up to tell their stories, including Clairemise Blanc, who said she’s being kicked out of her mobile home at the Little Farm trailer park on the border of El Portal that a developer recently purchased.

“Now that they’re kicking me out, I don’t know where to go. I’ll have to sleep under the bridge,” she said, choking back tears as she gripped a sign proclaiming, “Little Haiti is not for sale.” […]

Repeating Islands

littlehaiti.jpgThis article by Tim Elfrink appeared in the Miami New Times. Our thanks to Peter Jordens for bringing this item to our attention.

As the art world descends on South Florida for Miami Art Week, there’s no doubt the glitterati are shifting their gaze to Little Haiti. Everyone from New Timesto the New York Timeshas written this year about the Caribbean neighborhood’s shift as galleries flee rising Wynwood rents.

This morning, a coalition of community activists, business owners, and residents had a message for developers: Little Haiti won’t be the next Wynwood if they can help it.

“In the midst of this beautiful international art bonanza, in Little Haiti a different story has emerged,” said Marleine Bastien, executive director of Fanm Ayisyen nan Miyami, which organized the demonstration. “This is the story of business and homeowners being pressured and threatened one minute, sweet-talked the next to sell…

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Brooklyn Museum: Public Program, Curator Talk and Roundtable Discussion on Francisco Oller

elev8 ARTISTRY

Repeating Islands

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I just found out that Puerto Rican artist Miguel Luciano was invited by Brooklyn Museum’s education department to speak about history, culture and identity, and the work of Francisco Oller earlier today (December 2, 2015). This was part of a bilingual public program for young people entitled “El Brooklyn Museum es para ti” [The Brooklyn Museum is for you]. Luciano’s “Plátano Pride” (2006) was brought in from the permanent collection into the gallery and placed beside Francisco Oller’s “Plátanos amarillos” (1892-93) for the discussion.

Also, on December 12, the museum will host a Curator Talk and Roundtable Discussion with Puerto Rican artists on Francisco Oller at the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium, 3rd Floor.

1:00 pm Curator Talk
Richard Aste, Curator of European Art, Brooklyn Museum, and Edward J. Sullivan, Helen Gould Sheppard Professor of the History of Art, New York University, discuss the exhibition Impressionism and the Caribbean: Francisco…

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