Our dear brother and Black Panther comrade, Sekou Kambui made his transition last night

AMANDLA👊

Rest in UHURU, Bro. Sekou

Condolences to Our Afrikan Family

A Lutá Continuà

We Forward EVER✊

-Global_Sisterz

Moorbey'z Blog

Our dear brother and Black Panther comrade, Sekou Kambui (sn William Turk) made his transition last night. The struggle for freedom defined him in so many ways. After 47 years as a political prisoner in Alabama prisons, and his release in 2012, he can now rest in peace. Farewell my dear friend.
Audri Scott Williams

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https://denverabc.wordpress.com/2016/07/24/sekou-kambui-life-after-47-years-as-a-political-prisoner/

Sekou Kambui – Life After 47 Years as a Political Prisoner

July 24, 2016

sekou

Denver, CO – It has been two years since Sekou Kambui was released from the Alabama prison system after spending 47 years of his life incarcerated. He and fellow Human Rights activist Audri Scott Williams spoke in Denver on Thursday, July 14th, 2016 at an event hosted by Denver Anarchist Black Cross about his life after prison and their current collective work.

During his teenage years in the 1960s, Sekou participated in the Civil Rights movement through mobilizing…

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How black slaves were routinely sold as ‘specimens’ to ambitious white doctors

To quote Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr:

“Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane.

Excerpt:

Medical museums openly solicited black body parts and medical societies relied on black bodies. Students too wrote graduating theses based on the medical manipulation of black “subjects” and “specimens”.

Moorbey'z Blog

Used for whatever purpose. Slave by Shutterstock

The history of human experimentation is as old as the practice of medicine and in the modern era has always targeted disadvantaged, marginalised, institutionalised, stigmatised and vulnerable populations: prisoners, the condemned, orphans, the mentally ill, students, the poor, women, the disabled, children, peoples of colour, indigenous peoples and the enslaved.

Human subject research is evident wherever physicians, technicians, pharmaceutical companies (and others) are trialling new practices and implementing the latest diagnostic and therapeutic agents and procedures. And the American South in the days of slavery was no different – and for those looking for easy targets, black slave bodies were easy to come by.

Black bodies in the slave south

There is a rich and rapidly expanding scholarly literature examining the history of human subject research, including studies of the burgeoning bio-medical economy in the US in the 20th century. The Tuskegee experiment

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