Haydée Santamaría: 40 years after her death

Hasta la Victoria, Siempre! 🇨🇺✊🏾

fullPOWER SALUTE Compañera Haydée👊🏾 PRESENTÈ

Excerpt:

Haydée Santamaría, one of the first women to join the guerilla struggle in the Sierra Maestra and founder of the Casa de las Americas, remembered the Moncada’s horrors until the last day of her life, July 28, 1980, but these memories only strengthened her resolve.

“Honor her as a brave woman,” wrote Fina García Marruz in an ode to Haydée Santamaría after her death, describing in a few lines who Haydée was and how we should honor her.

On the 40th anniversary of her death, it is worth returning to the poet’s text before recounting, succinctly, her life and work.

(…) Cover her with flowers, like Ophelia. / Those who loved her have been orphaned / Cover her with the tenderness of your tears. / Become dew to refresh your mourning. / And if the devotion of flowers is not enough / Tell her in her ear that it was all a dream. / Honor her as a brave woman / Who lost her last battle alone. / Do not remain long in her inconsolable hour / Her deeds are not destined to the oblivion of the grass. / Let them be gathered one by one, / There, where the light does not forget its warriors.

The Uruguayan poet and essayist, Mario Benedetti, who worked with her for many years at the Casa de las Américas, wrote:

“Haydée Santamaría means a world, an attitude, a sensibility and also a Revolution.” […]

JSC: Jamaicans in Solidarity with Cuba

Source:  Granma
July 31 2000

haydee santamaria
Haydée Santamaría at the Casa de las Américas in March of 1980. Photo: Granma Archives

“Honor her as a brave woman,” wrote Fina García Marruz in an ode to Haydée Santamaría after her death, describing in a few lines who Haydée was and how we should honor her. On the 40th anniversary of her death, it is worth returning to the poet’s text before recounting, succinctly, her life and work.

(…) Cover her with flowers, like Ophelia. / Those who loved her have been orphaned / Cover her with the tenderness of your…

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